Deciding on Final Forms

I began this stage of form sketching by making a list of the key developmental stages that my design will be focusing on. The benchmarks that made up this list were: lying down while lifting arms outright, ‘tummy time’, sitting upright, balancing, crawling, creeping, and moving objects. The three pieces that compile my overall design will each be designed around a couple of these stages. However, they will have additional uses as well so that they will not have a limited usage time and as the child develops he/she will use them in different ways through exploration.

In addition, each one of the three pieces advance in movement from one to the next. As the child progresses physically, the pieces somewhat follow along in a sense as their own movement is increased. It is a subtle way for the design to grow alongside the child who is using them as they reach their milestones.

Going through the stages of development I am focusing on, I made a list of necessary and optional components that each position would require for support. For lying down while working on arm strength, the child will need head support and upper back support. Support that is optional would be underneath the entire body, underneath the arms, and slightly underneath the knees. For ‘tummy-time’, necessary support would be underneath the child’s chest as well as underneath the arms. Support that might be helpful but is not necessarily required would include a front curve to hang the arms over, underneath the entire body, as well as around the body. For sitting upright, back support and support behind the neck area would be required. Optional support includes under the leg support and surrounding support. Based on these components, I sketched basic forms that would accomplish all of the above in three separate pieces. These sketches, along with all of the research that I have done up until this point, have led to my three final form choices:

FinalThreeForms

(This diagram shows basic sketches for all three of the following design explanations, starting from the left side.)

Three Final Form Design Explanations:

1. First Design. 

This first form focuses on helping the child with arm lifting and ‘tummy time,’ both of which are stages in which the child has limited mobility in most of their body. These stages are an important area of focus since they are the foundation of all other developmental stages. The minimal form, meant to be used on both sides, has curves designed for specific positions. The specific placement of varying textures will initiate further movement in the child’s arms and legs. Ideally, the finished product would be made of a soft yet rigid material that will increase the child’s comfort by giving in slightly to their body weight while still supporting them off the floor.

2. Second Design.

This second design focuses on the developmental stages of sitting upright, balancing and learning to climb on and off objects. All of these involve the child learning to keep their upper body upright as well as maintaining that upright position stably for a period of time. The form has specific curves and thicknesses that are designed to be multi-purpose in function. Placed in one direction, it can be used to improve the child’s sitting position. A 90-degree back rest initiates the child to sit with proper posture comfortably. Textures are placed in specific areas for sensory stimulation and motivation for reaching outward.

When it is flipped upright, the design is used as a rocker. It is designed to be low enough for the child to place their feet on the floor while sitting on it and a bumpy texture serves as stoppers on the underside to prevent the piece from rocking too much. This rocking motion will increase the child’s balancing ability through play, further advancing on their physical advancement as well as their motor skills. Another possible addition is that the form will be filled with sand. This could serve as a base support that will shift where it is needed when the piece is moved from one position to the next.

3. Third Design.

This last design focuses on more advanced stages of mobility, including crawling, creeping and moving objects. These are the stages in which the child has gained enough mobility to begin moving about their surrounding environment. They are also the stages when the child is playing more independently than before, allowing the parent to observe their child’s progress as opposed to having the child rely on them for help. This piece has no set position; it is meant to rotate in order to move with the child.

The child is able to crawl through and feel the different textures lining the interior surface of the form. They can push the lightweight piece in order to work on arm strengthening as well as to chase after it, increasing their ability to both crawl and creep. Keeping the child’s interest with a unique form that is able to move will help them advance on these movements without having to think about what they are doing. They can also lie inside and reach around to grasp different areas and feel through the gaps, which will help increase their fine motor skills.

All three of these pieces are meant to be used both individually and as a unit. They were designed with specific functions in mind, yet their ambiguous forms allow their usages to extend further than those intended purposes, giving them a longer lifespan than other similar products currently on the market.