Progress is What Matters Most

Meeting with my Advisor: PT

Although I have been jumping ahead to researching materials and textures, I had to take a step back and focus on the actual form of what I will be designing. I had a meeting with PT to review the main developmental stages I will be focusing on and to find out how to go about designing the specific curves based on the necessary physical positions.

I had already narrowed down the age range I am focusing on, which is the 6 month to 14/15 month age range. Within this time, most of the physical development that takes place includes ‘tummy time’, sitting, crawling, creeping, balancing, climbing to get on and off of things, kneeling on objects and even walking. I had some trouble differentiating crawling and creeping until PT showed me the difference. Crawling is when the child pulls himself forward on his stomach, using his hands and legs to pull his body forward. Creeping is when the child moves into a quadruped position, moving forward on both hands and knees in order to move forward.

When working with a child, PT told me that there are overall guidelines for where the child should be at developmentally. However, it really goes according to the schedule of each individual child. When asking her what stage the child should be at during each age range, she told me that there is no set answer. Instead of forcing a child to be at a specific place at a specific time, physical therapists promote stages of progress. As long as there is progress occurring, that is what matters most. Therefore, there is no set developmental timeline for children with abnormal muscle tone. There are just stages that should follow one another and my design will help further this progression.

As a physical therapist, PT says that even when a child gains a skill, one must look at the way it is done. If the physical positioning is incorrect, it will put unnecessary pressure on the child’s joints. In addition, skipping over developmental stages will effect those that follow. A good, strong and stable core is key; the more stable you are there, the more control you have away from the body.

One very important position is known as ‘crossing midline’, which is when the child transitions from their hand and knees and then back into the sitting position. The child is moving off of their center line of axis in order to rotate, which is a big struggle since children tend to get stuck in a frontal position. It is a great transitional position in the earlier developmental stages to enhance their bilateral coordination, which is when they learn to use both sides of their body equally. If there is a dominant side that the child uses, a physical therapist will encourage the use of the other side as well so the dominance is balanced out.

CrossingMidlineCrossing midline develops the child’s hip muscles, core muscles, arm strength and visual tracking. For a child to keep their head midline, to weight bear on one hand and to reach out with the other hand is incredibly difficult for them. In addition, children who are still developing physically often keep their legs straight out in front of them. It anchors them for stability since it is a very broad base that is holding them upright. Once their legs are up in a crossed position, there is less surface area for support and a large bulk of their weight is placed on their bottom.

Learning about specific positions during the developmental process helps me understand the importance of each one individually and how they transition into the next positions. It is also incredibly useful learning about them from PT since she will sit next to me and demonstrate the positions step by step. Seeing them acted out physically allows me to understand them much more than I do by just viewing images on the internet.

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